MANAAKITANGA (HOSPITALITY) 

He aha te mea nui o te Ao? He tangata, He tangata, He tangata!

What is most important in the world?  It is people, people, people! 

 

One of our core values, Manaakitanga encapsulates care and respect for people and relationships, including the natural environment.  It governs the way we interact with one another.  An essential part of Maori culture is our desire to feed and nurture people.  We demonstrate our love and respect for people by providing them with outstanding food. 

Our team is proud of our oysters.  The result of hard work, dedication and expertise.  We are excited to share them with the rest of the world!

 

Meet some of the team.

  Grant Williams – Oyster Farm Manager

 

Grant Williams – Oyster Farm Manager

  Jason Houliston – Oyster Deck Hand

 

Jason Houliston – Oyster Deck Hand

  Joe Donaldson – Oyster Deck Hand

 

Joe Donaldson – Oyster Deck Hand

Andy Elliot – Research Manager

Andy Elliot – Research Manager

Meg Malcom – Events Manager

Meg Malcom – Events Manager

Jess Ericson – Aquaculture Scientist

Jess Ericson – Aquaculture Scientist

Our Identity

Māori are the indigenous people of Aotearoa New Zealand. As a Māori company, we have a strong spiritual connection to the land, to our culture and a tradition of kaitiakitanga, guardianship of our natural resources.

We are committed to conserving the environment and investing in industries that will continue to provide for our owners for many generations to come. Our participation in the aquaculture industry reinforces our values and our vision for the future. It is also our way of promoting Māori culture to the world.

Our Kiwa branding includes a number of elements that pay tribute to our culture and what we treasure as a Māori organisation. These include traditional Māori art forms and genealogy.

KIWA

Kiwa is a personification of the South Pacific Ocean – the waves, whales, moon and water.  The myth or legend is that Kiwa partnered with Hine Moana – goddess of the coastlines/erosions.  Kiwa and Hine Moana’s daughter is Hine Tapiritia – mother of oysters, scallops and mussels.  

Together, Kiwa and Hine Moana personify natural processes – a natural balance.  

The device includes a whales tale and Koru – it also symbolises the moon.

In Māori culture, the koru or spiral symbolises growth, life and the natural world. 

In the spirit of this tradition, Kiwa celebrates this iconic spiral. It represents the growth of our company and the journey of our people from the past to today. This koru signifies our long-term intergenerational goals.

 

Rauponga

Carving is one of the most celebrated and recognised forms of Māori art. Historically, wood, greenstone and bone were used to create essential items to assist in catching, propagating and preparing food. Over time Māori developed the skill of carving to create elaborate and artistic objects. 

Various types of surface patterns are adopted by carvers. One of the most common is rauponga, characterised by a row of notched chevrons. Rauponga is represented in the unique typeface used for Kiwa, a tribute to the tradition of carving.